Adam Lapp

The Best Conversion Rate optimizers do NOT make changes to webpages…

August 23rd, 2016
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Editor’s Note: For anyone new to this blog, Adam Lapp has been MarketingExperiments’ head of optimization for around three years. He’s been optimizing web paths for much longer, though – somewhere in the ballpark of 10 years. I’ve personally worked with Adam for five years now, and he has, hands down, the most brilliant optimization mind I’ve ever seen.

So naturally, I was thrilled when he sent me a draft of this post for the blog. It’s been a while since Adam took some time out of his busy schedule to write for our blog, but his posts are full of real-world optimization wisdom that many of our readers have found invaluable in the past.

The casual tone of this post may be a little different from what you might be used to on this blog. That’s because I’ve left Adam’s personal writing style, for the most part, intact. This post is written by a true expert and I wanted it to be as directly from the source as possible.

I hope you enjoy. Here’s Adam…

Best,

Paul Cheney

Managing Editor

 

Best Conversion Rate optimizers_Adam

 

I remember I once I designed and ran four tests in a row — two product page tests and two homepage tests — for a Fortune 500 industrial supply company, and lost every time. The designs were solid – better navigation, easier to find buttons, improved copy and value proposition – but they all lost.

When I look back at it, these four tests lost because I was trying to optimize webpages.

So, what the heck am I talking about?

Well fortunately and unfortunately, the probability of a prospect converting begins increasing or decreasing long before they get your website.

Read more…

Daniel Burstein

Data Analysis 101: How a nonprofit used data to secure a critical business decision and help find 125 missing children

August 16th, 2016
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We all have decisions we’re trying to drive. It may be getting budget approval from your manager. Or, selling a client on a campaign. It could be getting venture capital funding, or signing up the right business partner.

Our effectiveness in securing these decisions can have a significant impact on our success. And one way to make the case is by using data.

“Data adds credibility to the claims you’re making,” said Derrick Jackson, Director of Data Reporting and Analytics, MECLABS Institute (the parent research organization of MarketingExperiments). “It’s like the Fight the Squirrel videos say: It can all come across as opinion. But if you bring numbers, it adds validity.”

In this MarketingExperiments blog post, we look at a basic story of how one nonprofit used data to help drive a decision to see what you can learn from its efforts.

 

The challenge

BairFind is a nonprofit based in Jacksonville, Florida, dedicated to finding missing children by placing pictures of missing children in heavily trafficked areas of minor league baseball stadiums. For example, here is a picture from a Jacksonville Suns game.

 

Data Analysis 101

Read more…

Paul Cheney

Selling the Click vs. Selling the Product: Which Strategy is More Effective for a Text-Based PPC Ad?

August 9th, 2016
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Imagine for a moment that you need to write a PPC search ad for an event your company is running. It’s an event so you’re on a tight timeline. In fact, you have a week to run the ads. At the end of the week, your early discount of 5% ends.

Long story, short, you need to build a text-based PPC campaign that gets a lot of people to buy tickets, and you don’t really have time to figure out what strategy works through a/b testing or historical data mining.

What do you do?

An organization that [full disclosure] partners with MECLABS (MarketingExperiments’ parent company) to help optimize its event messaging was faced with a similar situation recently.

The strategies, while simple in wording are fairly radical in nature.

 

TP30091_1-page_z

 

For the control ad, the primary message sold the actual value of the event.

“2 Days and 13 World Class Speakers”

For the treatment ad, the primary message sold the page on the other side of the click.

It was a fundamental shift in the process-level value proposition of the ad. One was aimed at the ultimate objective of purchasing event tickets. One was aimed at the shorter term objective of clicking through to the video mentioned in the ad.

The result of that shift was a 102% increase in thank-you page impressions. One important thing to note is that the average thank-you page impression generated more than one ticket sale. So this ad treatment hit the bottom line dramatically.

 

You might also like…

Consumer Reports Value Proposition Test: What you can learn from a 29% drop in clickthrough

PPC Marketing: Testing value proposition messaging increases clickthrough 88%

Writing an Email Like a Human “Absolutely Crushed” A Traditional Marketing Send [2 Min Video]

Earn a Graduate Certificate in Communicating Value and Web Conversion

 

Paul Cheney

Writing an Email Like a Human “Absolutely Crushed” A Traditional Marketing Send [2 Min Video]

August 1st, 2016
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“If you write an email like a human being would write an email, you’re going to get a better response.”

So says Nathaniel Ward, Associate Director, Online Membership Programs, The Heritage Foundation. The Heritage Foundation is a non profit conservative think tank focused on conservative policy formation and promotion.

I realize quoting a political organization of any kind is just asking for an incendiary response in today’s political environment, but bear with me on this one.

Partisan or not, they have a very sophisticated email marketing department, especially for a non profit. And Ward’s approach to email testing and messaging is critical for any organization to study and learn from.

Time Stamps:
0:27 – How the test was set up

1:17 – The results of the test

1:26 – Interpretation of the test results

1:43 – Ward’s takeaway for other marketers

You might also like…

Consumer Reports Value Proposition Test: What you can learn from a 29% drop in clickthrough

Online Testing: How a B2B SaaS nonprofit increased clickthrough on landing page by 291%

Email Marketing: Nonprofit achieves 12.5 times higher donation revenue per email than industry average

Earn a Graduate Certificate in Communicating Value and Web Conversion

Daniel Burstein

Email Marketing: Test ideas for five types of email

July 1st, 2016
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Testing your email marketing can help power some pretty impressive results – like a 100% increase in clickthrough or a 114% boost in revenue.

But … let’s be real … it is harder to test your email than to just send a single version of the email idea you come up with.

One challenge with email marketing – to keep your customers clicking and coming back for more, you need to endlessly come up with new messages and ideas for every email you send or set in an automation platform.

However, when you test your email marketing, you don’t get to create just one email for each campaign, you now need an A and a B (and a C and a D … etc. … etc. … depending on how many treatments you have and your list size can support).

To give you some new hypothesis ideas for your next email test, I interviewed Mike Nelson, Co-founder and Head of Marketing, ReallyGoodEmails.com, in the MarketingSherpa Media Center (MarketingSherpa is the sister publishing brand to MarketingExperiments).

He brought examples of five key types of marketing email from his site, which is described as a “modern-day museum” full of emails.

Read more…

Paul Cheney

How Philip Morris & Co. Created One of the Greatest Marketing Campaigns in History Using Aristotle’s Logic

June 23rd, 2016
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“Philip Morris & Co. (now Altria) had originally introduced the Marlboro brand as a woman’s cigarette in 1924,” according to Wikipedia.

In 1954, however, that all changed. Launching what’s known as one of the most universally successful advertising campaigns in history, Leo Burnett created The Marlboro Man.

Whatever you think about smoking, put it aside for a second. Right or wrong, The Marlboro Man produced serious results for Phillip Morris.

The thing that’s interesting for readers of this blog is that Phillip Morris’ team did it by employing a repeatable strategy.

It’s not a strategy that makes it all right to outright lie to your customers, but it is a strategy that you can employ for both great products and bad products.

And it was invented 2,300 years ago by a man named Aristotle.

Aristotle created the notion of the “syllogism,” or “deduction” as it is often translated from Aristotle’s Greek.

Here’s an excerpt from Aristotle’s Prior Analytics that defines “deduction.”

A deduction is speech (logos) in which, certain things having been supposed, something different from those supposed results of necessity because of their being so. (Prior Analytics I.2, 24b18–20)

– Quoted from The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

In last week’s web clinic, “Repeatable Brand Strategy,” Flint McGlaughlin explained it like this:

 

syllogism-definition-branding

 

Aristotle’s syllogisms are at the heart of every successful brand strategy whether the creators are aware or not. Brands can leverage Aristotle’s idea of the syllogism to create a repeatable and successful brand strategy by creating what Flint calls a “virtual syllogism.”

By creating The Marlboro Man, Phillip Morris and Leo Burnett incidentally created the following virtual syllogism:

 

syllogism-branding-example-marlboro

 

It seems simple, but it set Marlboro apart from their competitors who were still trying to highlight things like the “health benefits” of filters or flavors.

 

You might also like:

Repeatable Brand Strategy  [MarketingExperiments web clinic replay]

Inbound Marketing: HP turns interns into brand ambassadors with Twitter contest [From MarketingSherpa]

Brand Affinity: Mellow Mushroom builds engagement via original content, e-club program [From MarketingSherpa]

Hacking Patagonia’s PR Strategy: How to improve your brand’s voice and influence [From MarketingSherpa]

7 Surprisingly Successful Brands on Instagram [From MarketingSherpa]

Does Brand Really Matter? [MarketingExperiments web clinic replay]

An Executive Look at Newspaper Industry Transformation [From MECLABS Institute]