John Tackett

Copywriting: Brevity is the soul of marketing

November 20th, 2014

I’ve always loved this quote:

“Brevity is the soul of wit.” – William Shakespeare

To me, its beauty rests in the powerful meaning packed in six simple words. Brevity can also be used as a tool to aid your marketing, as I discovered from a recent email experiment.

But first, a little more detail about the experiment.

Background: A global producer of high-quality audio equipment and accessories.

Goal: To increase clickthrough rates in an email.

Research Question: Which email will generate the highest clickthrough rate?

Test Design: A/B multifactor, radical redesign split test

 

Control email-test-control

 

In a preliminary review of the control, the MECLABS research team hypothesized the control was at risk of underperforming and could use some strategic tweaks.

 

Treatment

 

For the treatment, the team removed the stock image that focused on lifestyle to showcase the product using a larger image.

The headline was also changed to “An entirely new way to stream music wirelessly in any room easier than ever before” to help add emphasis on utility.

 

Results

 

The treatment saw a 27% increase in clickthrough rate that validated with a 99% statistical level of confidence.

 

What you need to know

If there is one simple takeaway from this test, from my point of view, it’s that brevity is the heart of relevance and the soul of marketing.

In this case, the customers seemed to agree.

The optimized headline was more concise with the product’s ability to “stream music wirelessly” to “any room.”

Clearly communicating what you can do with a product is likely to generate more relevance and appeal for email recipients over the long run.

But what about the images, you may ask? Clarity also was a driver of delivering meaning and here’s why:

The optimized email removed the stock image of people and focused solely on the product itself.

By telling you what the product can do versus where it fits in your kitchen, the new imagery immediately and clearly connected recipients with the essence of the offer.

If you’re interested in learning more about how this experiment held convert attention into clicks, you can check out the newly released Web clinic, “Converting Opens to Clicks.”

 

You may also like

Marketing Automation: Precor achieves 74% lift in new leads via segmented database overhaul [Case study]

Email Marketing: The Kentucky Derby’s customer-centric newsletter reduces opt-out rate 64% [Case study]

Newsletter Engagement: 3 tactics Calendars.com used to improve its monthly sends [More from the blogs]

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Categories: Analytics & Testing Tags: , , , , , ,

Jessica Lorenz

Co-creation: The next realization of value-based marketing

November 17th, 2014

“If I am your ideal customer, why should I purchase your product rather than any other product?” – Flint McGlaughlin, Managing Director, MECLABS (parent company of MarketingExperiments)

At MarketingExperiments, researchers have used this question to develop value propositions over the past 20 years.

Many things have changed over the past couple decades, which has now, more than ever, left room for the customer to answer the value prop question.

Recently, Professor Wouter Van Rossum, a leading expert on value proposition and product development, held an Academic Lecture Series at MECLABS headquarters in Jacksonville, Fla., where he discussed the evolution of a value proposition in a post-Twitter world.

“Companies don’t want to hear [feedback],” Van Rossum explained, “They don’t like to hear it.”

But, in an era where customers can ask questions and interact with not only the company, but fellow dissatisfied customers online and demand a more and more personalized experience, it “more or less forces companies into co-creation.”

 

Defining co-creation

Co-creation implies a situation where both parties profit in terms of exchange value.

threadless-shirt-contest

 

A “perfect example of co-creation,” according to Van Rossum is Threadless, a company that allows designers to submit art for T-shirts, among other commodities. Customers then vote on designs they want to purchase.

If the design is picked up by Threadless, the designers earn a portion of the profits from T-shirts sold and this creates an exchange of value.

Co-creation of exchange value, according to Van Rossum, implies that the company should determine a value proposition that will account for the customer’s contribution and result in a win-win situation for both the customer and the business.

In the case of Threadless: The company queues up designs that they know will be popular and purchased. The designer earns not only monetary rewards but also has work to add to their portfolio. Both parties benefit from the relationship and business model.

Read more…

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Josh Wilson

Customer Anxiety: One element of the MECLABS Conversion Heuristic explained

November 13th, 2014

If you have participated in a MECLABS, MarketingExperiments or MarketingSherpa event or education program, you may have been exposed to the patented Conversion Heuristic.

It looks like this:

C = 4m + 3v + 2(i – f) – 2a

If you haven’t seen this before, it can be explained in minutes. However, it can take decades to master.

My hope is this MarketingExperiments Blog post will help you gain a basic understanding of the Conversion Heuristic, and specifically, understand the anxiety element in the heuristic.

Each letter in the Conversion Heuristic represents a psychological, emotional or physical element affecting a prospect’s choice to say “yes” or “no” to your offer.

Each number represents the weight or importance each element carries in guiding the prospect to your offer, or away from your offer.

The element “C” represents the probability of conversion. A conversion in this instance describes the event when a prospect becomes a customer.

This event is the foundation of business; without conversion, a business ceases to exist. To increase the probability of conversion, it is important to understand the elements within the Conversion Heuristic. In this post, I will highlight the “anxiety” element present in every conversion process.

Here is the Conversion Heuristic again: C = 4m + 3v + 2(i – f) – 2a

C = Probability of conversion

m = Motivation of the customer

v = Force of your value proposition

i = Incentive

f = Friction

a = Anxiety

 

Customer anxiety

It is very important to remember that your prospects are people. They have thoughts, feelings, needs and desires. When there is product or service being offered to a prospect, that prospect may have questions or concerns.

This psychological concern occurs within the prospect’s mind.

Anxiety is a real concern that the prospect may have regarding your offer. The prospect may not even be aware that it is happening, but when corrected or addressed, there can be some significant lifts in your conversion rate.

Here are some examples of anxieties that people may have when making purchases online.

 

Is my credit card information safe?

billing-information

  Read more…

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Daniel Burstein

How to Improve Conversion of Your Online Ads

November 10th, 2014

From pay-per-click advertising to display ads, all online advertising is a micro-yes, a step in the process to the ultimate conversion.

To help you improve conversion of this micro-yes, Flint McGlaughlin, Managing Director, MECLABS, created the MECLABS Online Ad Sequence based on online advertising experimentation for both B2B and consumer marketers.

How can you improve conversion of your online ads? Focus on the three factors identified in the sequence:

 online-ads-conversion

 

Let me explain the elements in the sequence in a little further detail.

 

Effectiveness of the ad

This isn’t an equation to be solved. This is a heuristic, or thought tool (kind of like checklist) to guide your thinking as you look to optimize your online advertising.

The more you improve the elements to the right of the equation side, the more you will be able to increase the effectiveness of your ad.

  Read more…

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David Kirkpatrick

Testing and Optimization: 4 inspirational examples of experimentation and success

November 6th, 2014

At our sister publication, MarketingSherpa, we publish four case study beats – B2B, B2C, Email and Inbound – with stories covering actual marketing efforts from your peers each week. Not every case study features a testing and optimization element, but many do.

For this MarketingExperiments Blog post, I wanted to share a quick summary of several of these case studies, along with links to the entire article (including creative samples) in case any pique your interest and you want to dig into the entire campaign.

So, without further ado, read on for four MarketingSherpa case studies that feature testing and optimization of various digital marketing channels, strategies and tactics.

 

Case Study #1. 91% conversion lift from new copy and layout

This case study features AwayFind, a company that provides mobile email alerts, and covers an effort to test, and hopefully improve, its homepage performance.

Brian Smith, Director of Marketing, AwayFind, said, “Our primary driver of traffic is our PR efforts. Our homepage is effectively our primary landing page, and we need to convert that traffic into premium users.”

The testing included both changing copy and layout elements. The main copy change was instead of focusing on features, the treatment copy focused on benefits, and layout tweaks included a shortened headline, the remaining copy was split between a subhead and a smaller block of text, and the color of the subhead text was also modified.

In this test, the treatment achieved:

  • 42% increase in clicks to the sign-up page
  • 91% increase in registrations for the trial

  Read more…

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Joey Taravella

Value Proposition: Between perception and reality

November 3rd, 2014

I recently posted this observation on FlintsNotes, Flint McGlaughlin’s blog designed to showcase his day-to-day work, and I felt that this idea could be elaborated on more:

The challenge for many companies is misunderstood. It is not finding prospects that need what it has to offer, but rather finding prospects who know that they need what it has to offer.

Managers flounder in the gap between perception and reality. They are trained to think about data, facts and rules. This strength obscures a corresponding weakness: They fail to account for the difference between ‘what is’ and ‘what the prospect believes is.’ The latter initiates the experience of the former and thus takes initial precedence.

-Flint McGlaughlin, Managing Director, MECLABS

 

The difference between reality and perception

Fint talks about how managers (marketers) tend to get lost in the blurred line of perception and reality, failing to recognize the difference between “what is” (reality) and “what the prospect believes is” (perception).

He points out that the latter (perception) initiates the experience of the former (reality), thus taking initial precedence.

Read more…

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