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Archive for the ‘Landing Page Optimization’ Category

Ecommerce: 3 landing page elements to help increase product emphasis

July 14th, 2014 No comments

The elements on a product page are often one of the most underutilized tools a marketer has at their disposal. I say this, because let’s be honest, I’d wager few folks think of design elements on a product page in a “tool mindset.”

But in some respects, that’s exactly what they are, and ultimately, that’s how you will determine the kind of customer experience you build in ecommerce.

In this MarketingExperiments Blog post, I wanted to share three elements you can tweak to help emphasize important products and maybe even increase your revenue along the way.

 

Element #1. Size 

product-page-elements

 

Here’s an excellent example of how resizing a product image can help you place emphasis on it.

In the control, there were three products on the right sidebar and they were all equally weighted – that is a problem.

Nothing really stood out, which made drawing a clear conclusion for customers a little difficult.

In the treatment, instead of having three separate products on the page, the marketers hypothesized that a single product with a dropdown selection for a computer operating system would increase conversion.

Their hypothesis was right – the results from the tests included a 24% increase in revenue.

 

Element #2. Color 

email-product-testing

 

Here is another example of using elements in an email that you should pay close attention to because products are not trapped on pages in storefronts.

That perception is far from reality.

According to the MarketingSherpa Ecommerce Benchmark Study (download a complimentary copy at that link), email is one of the biggest drivers of ecommerce traffic.

In the treatment, the number of products were reduced, and bright red copy was used as supporting emphasis. I’m not fluent in Italian, but in any language, that is a good thing.

As you can see, color emphasis and copy now drive this email. From the changes in the treatment, I can intuitively understand the desired outcome:

  • I can order something at a great price
  • I get something free (gratis) as a thank-you gift
  • It only takes three easy steps to order

The treatment delivered a 24% increase in revenue with the right changes needed to have a powerful impact.

Read more…

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Landing Page Optimization: What a 29% drop in conversion can teach you about friction

July 7th, 2014 No comments

I’m sure most of you have heard the old proverb: The road to ruin is paved with the best of intentions.

In fact, if you have a different version of it, feel free to share it in the comments below.

The proverb is a great example of the subtle dangers in optimizing a process with no perspective on how the big picture is potentially impacted by those changes.

In this MarketingExperiments Blog post, I wanted to take a close look at a checkout process experiment and what we can all learn from this company when it comes to identifying the subtle dangers in optimization that often accompany intention.

 

Friction is a psychological reservation toward your desired outcome

friction-on-page

 

Before we get started, I want to first explain what friction is. MarketingExperiments defines friction as “a psychological resistance to a given element in a sales process.”

So when you optimize to reduce friction, you’re really optimizing to reduce the reasons a person has for not taking your desired action.

Also, friction exists everywhere, but the slide above does a really nice job of providing a simple illustration of reducing fiction in a form.

 

You may make a process shorter … 

difficulty-checkout-process

 

Friction is not always so easy to identify and eliminate. Take a look at these two versions of a checkout process for example.

Version A is a three-step cart checkout process that is a little lengthy.

The MECLABS research team hypothesized that by shortening the steps into a one-page accordion checkout process (Version B), they could reduce length-oriented friction.

 

… but it’s no guarantee that it’s easier for a customer

 treatment-conversion-decrease

The accordion-style checkout in Version B decreased conversion 29%. Ouch!

But there’s an even more important question here: Why did an increasingly popular checkout process get trounced by the process that looks more burdensome?

  Read more…

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Landing Page Optimization: Testing green marketing increases conversion 46%

June 5th, 2014 2 comments

Green marketing is a tactic built on the premise that environmental preference will hopefully equal customer preference.

But does green marketing truly have an impact on customer purchase behavior?

In today’s MarketingExperiments Blog post, we’ll take a look at an experiment that was featured in a recent Web clinic that put green marketing to the test.

Before we dive in, let’s review the research notes on the test.

Background: A mid-sized furniture company selling mattresses.

Goal: To increase the overall number of mattress purchases.

Research Question: Which credibility approach will produce the highest rate of mattress purchases?

Test Design: A/B variable cluster split test

 

Control

green-marketing-control 

During the Web clinic, the MECLABS research team explained the featured product was one of only a few mattresses that are currently GreenGuard Gold certified.

Consequently, they hypothesized the certification had little emphasis on the page design and was not communicating the full value of the certification.

 

Treatment

green-marketing-treatment

In the treatment, additional copy was added to increase the emphasis on the full value of the GreenGuard certification.

 

Results

 green-marketing-results

 

The additional GreenGuard copy increased conversion nearly 46%.

Read more…

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Landing Page Optimization: Multi-product page increases revenue 70%

May 5th, 2014 No comments

Finding the right balance of product and presentation on a landing page that markets multiple products can be a tricky endeavor as products compete for customer attention.

In today’s MarketingExperiments Blog post, let’s look at a recent test that not only increased revenue, but also increased our understanding about customer behavior.

Before we dive in, let’s get a little background research information on the test.

 

Background: An independent vitamin manufacturer and distributor.

Goal: To increase the total revenue from the page.

Primary Research Question: Which page will generate the highest total revenue?

Approach: A/B multifactorial split test

 

Side by side

In the experiment, Treatment A used a radio button format for each of the offers featured. In Treatment B, the design was a horizontal layout that let users compare offers.

 

Results

Read more…

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Landing Page Optimization: Radio buttons vs. dropdowns

March 13th, 2014 4 comments

Radio buttons or dropdowns?

The question is arguably on the borderline of arbitrary, but as we discovered, this choice is far more important than one might think.

During a recent Web clinic, Austin McCraw, Jon Powell and Lauren Pitchford, all of MECLABS, revealed the results of an experiment that put button options to the test.

So, let’s take a closer look at the research notes for some background information on the test.

Background: A large people search company catering to customers searching for military personnel.

Goal: To significantly increase the total number of subscriptions.

Primary Research Question: Which subscription option format will produce the highest subscription rate: radio buttons or a dropdown menu?

Approach: A/B single factorial split test

In Treatment 1, the research team hypothesized that the length of the radio button layout was a source of user friction in the form.

Editor’s Note: For the purposes of the MarketingExperiments testing methodology, friction is defined as “a psychological resistance to a given element in the sales or signup process.”

 

 

In Treatment 2, the team tested a dropdown style option selection to reduce the perceived friction in the display.

 

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LPO: How many columns should you use on a landing page?

February 6th, 2014 2 comments

What is the highest performing number of columns for your webpages?

The question is deceptively simple and difficult to determine unless you test your way to the optimal layout for your needs.

During a recent Web clinic, Jon Powell, Senior Executive Content Writer, MECLABS, revealed how a large tech company decided to test its column layout in an effort to increase sales from its branded search efforts.

So, let’s review the research notes for some background information on the test.

 

Background: A large technology company selling software to small businesses.

Goal: To significantly increase the number of software purchases from paid search traffic (branded terms).

Primary Research Question: Which column layout will generate the highest rate of software purchases?

Approach: A/B multifactor split test

 

Here’s a screenshot of the control which utilized a two column layout – one main column and a right sidebar – featuring separate content and CTAs. 

 

In the treatment, the team eliminated the sidebar and focused on a single-column layout.

What you need to know

The one-column design increased branded search orders by 680.6% and revenue per visit by 606.7% when tested against the two-column design.

To learn more about why the single-column layout outperformed the two-column design, watch the free on-demand Web clinic replay of “How Many Columns Should I Use?” to see the results of an aggregate column research study you can use to aid your own conversion rate optimization efforts.

  Read more…

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