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Archive for the ‘Landing Page Optimization’ Category

Landing Page Optimization: An overview of how one site increased leads by 155%

June 15th, 2015 4 comments

Simple, direct and bare. When your company and process is known around the world, a blank page with little competing content can not only work, but it can work really well.

Simplicity is key. Take a look at Google’s homepage:

 

What about new visitors? Imagine coming to this page for the first time, with little to no context of the company. What is this company? If I type something in that text box, for example, where will it take me?

Simplicity is not always a key to effective website optimization.

Leaders must grow comfortable with paradox and nuance. Clarity does not equate with simplicity.  Simplicity does not equate with easy.” — Flint McGlaughlin, On the Difference between Clarity and Simplicity.

Simplicity is the reduction of friction, but clarity is the optimization of the message. A simple message is not necessarily a clear message.

Take a look at a test we ran with a physicians-only social network that allows pharmaceutical companies to conduct survey research and promote products to their audience. The goal of this A/B split test was to identify which microsite would generate the most total leads.

Check out the control below. Can you find the value proposition?

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How Communicating Value Led to a 30% Increase in Overall Site Revenue

June 11th, 2015 No comments

The conversion sequence is actually a function of understanding the offer. We are not optimizing the product, we are optimizing the offer. As such, we are focused on two aspects: the content and the presentation.” — Flint McGlaughlin, On Improving the Conversion Sequence

The goal for most marketers is conversion. Often other metrics, like open rate and clickthrough, are tossed by the wayside for the “all-powerful” conversion.

I recently came across a test in the MECLABS research library that spoke to the idea of optimizing an offer through content and presentation. It also lent itself to the other side of metrics — elements such as conversion.

This company (which has been anonymized) offers a testing software for certification exam preparation in the form of a subscription model. For this test, an email was sent out to their customers apologizing for a new, somewhat confusing, pricing structure.

 

 

Once the link was clicked, customers were brought to a landing page which had different subscription models to choose from. Here is what the control looked like:

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Landing Page Optimization: Conversion increased 37% by reducing copy

In a recently published case study, run in the MarketingSherpa B2C Newsletter, we focused on a broad search engine marketing (SEM) effort by 911 Restoration, a property disaster recovery business.

Paid search was an important element in that campaign, and testing and optimization on different elements also proved to be important to its success. Ten years after kicking off the focus on SEM, 90% of leads at 911 Restoration can be directly attributed to its SEO and PPC strategy and tactics.

This MarketingExperiments Blog post features one paid search test at 911 Restoration on its PPC landing pages. The test involved dramatically reducing the amount of copy on the landing page to discover how that impacted conversion, cost per acquisition and AdWords quality score.

 

Background

According to Miri Offir, Chief Marketing Officer, 911 Restoration, “The long copy was legacy content we inherited from the SEO team several months ago. After sending paid search clicks to these old long-copy pages for a few months, we decided to test shorter, more-focused copy against our long-copy control sites.”

She added, “We incorporated standard direct response, conversion-oriented copywriting heuristics to achieve this. Essentially, authoritative brevity was our goal because logically it followed that emergency oriented calls originated from users who did not want to read additional copy and instead only wanted a contact phone number.”

With the shorter landing page copy, the team expected an increase in leads generated due to a simplified user experience.

 

Control 

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Landing Page Optimization: How a navigation test increased leads 34%

February 19th, 2015 1 comment

Site navigation can make or break the user experience on your site.

So what can you do about it?

In today’s MarketingExperiments Blog post, I wanted to share with you an interesting experiment from our latest Web clinic that shows how a tourism group increased leads 34% by testing their site navigation.

Before we get any further, let’s take a look at the experiment:

Background: A tourism commission seeking to enhance visitor interaction with their website content in order to boost appeal for choosing their city over other destinations.

Goal: Test the site navigation to increase visitor engagement with key site content.

Primary Research Question: Which navigation type will increase site engagement?

Secondary Research Question: Which navigation type will lead to the highest lead generation rate?

Test Design: A/B/C split test

In the control above, the MECLABS research team hypothesized that the navigation was increasing user friction by including an almost-overwhelming amount of options.

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Online Testing: Why are you really testing?

January 21st, 2015 1 comment

The start of a new year gives savvy marketers another chance to push exploring your customer’s theory even further. In today’s MarketingExperiments Blog post, I want to welcome 2015 by sharing with you a simple product page test from our last Web clinic you can use to aid your marketing efforts.

Before we dive in further, let’s look at the background on the experiment:

 

Background: A mid-sized furniture company selling mattresses online

Goal: To increase mattress purchases

Research Question: Which design will generate the most online purchases?

Test Design: A/B variable cluster test

 

Side-by-side 

 

Here’s a side-by-side split of the two designs and the variables being tested to help give a little context to their placement on the page.

 

As you can tell from the comparison here, Design A was centered on an approach that used less text, with copy that placed emphasis on a low risk trial, free shipping and returns as well as a 25-year warranty.

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Landing Page Optimization: Simple, short form increases leads 40%

January 15th, 2015 1 comment

When looking to generate more leads from a landing page, make sure your objective is well defined on the page. A small, hidden call-to-action may not be seen by visitors, leaving potential leads unsure of the next step.

If this is the case, you may not need a radical redesign on the page. Instead, a simple and small change — highlighting the form as the next step in the visitor’s thought sequence — could increase the number of leads you capture.

Wanting more prospective students to fill out its lead gen form, American Sentinel University worked with MECLABS as a Research Partner. Read on to learn how a small change to the page increased the form completion rate by 40%.

 

Background: American Sentinel University, an accredited online university.
Objective: To increase the number of leads captured to speak with an advisor.
Primary Research Question: Which treatment will yield the highest conversion rate (i.e., form completion)?
Test Design: A/B test

 

When looking at the data analytics for its website, American Sentinel found that just 8% of unique visitors make it to a “Request More Information” form page. However, once a visitor arrives at a form, the data shows a completion rate of 43%.

“So we saw that there was motivation to fill out; the challenge was getting them there,” said Warren Staley, Research Manager, MECLABS Institute.

Previously, there were two ways for visitors to get to a “Request More Information” form page:

  1. A short form on the homepage, which leads to a second, longer form to acquire additional information from prospects
  2. Links throughout the site, including on each degree overview page and in the top navigation bar

The MECLABS research team wondered if there was enough value on the homepage to entice people to fill out the lead capture form at that point in their thought process. Thinking this approach might be a case of the cart being presented before the horse, the team developed an experiment to test this hypothesis.

(Editor’s Note: For your convenience, we’ve provided creative samples in two formats – SlideShare and thumbnails that expand when you click them.)

 

 

Control

The degree overview pages have a wealth of valuable information, and the next step in a prospect’s thought sequence is to request more information before making the ultimate conversion of applying.

However, the page didn’t generate the clickthrough or completed forms the university wanted.

The MECLABS research team identified a few value and friction issues that potentially hindered the pages’ effectiveness:

  • There is no value regarding why a visitor may want additional information.
  • The page doesn’t effectively guide visitors through a logical thought sequence.
  • Current “Request More Information” call-to-action (CTA) is buried and may not attract user attention.
  • The request link in the header is lost due to multiple navigation bars.
  • With multiple columns and navigations, too many competing objectives make it difficult for visitors to know what they’re supposed to do on the page.

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