Paul Cheney

Selling the Click vs. Selling the Product: Which Strategy is More Effective for a Text-Based PPC Ad?

August 9th, 2016
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Imagine for a moment that you need to write a PPC search ad for an event your company is running. It’s an event so you’re on a tight timeline. In fact, you have a week to run the ads. At the end of the week, your early discount of 5% ends.

Long story, short, you need to build a text-based PPC campaign that gets a lot of people to buy tickets, and you don’t really have time to figure out what strategy works through a/b testing or historical data mining.

What do you do?

An organization that [full disclosure] partners with MECLABS (MarketingExperiments’ parent company) to help optimize its event messaging was faced with a similar situation recently.

The strategies, while simple in wording are fairly radical in nature.

 

TP30091_1-page_z

 

For the control ad, the primary message sold the actual value of the event.

“2 Days and 13 World Class Speakers”

For the treatment ad, the primary message sold the page on the other side of the click.

It was a fundamental shift in the process-level value proposition of the ad. One was aimed at the ultimate objective of purchasing event tickets. One was aimed at the shorter term objective of clicking through to the video mentioned in the ad.

The result of that shift was a 102% increase in thank-you page impressions. One important thing to note is that the average thank-you page impression generated more than one ticket sale. So this ad treatment hit the bottom line dramatically.

 

You might also like…

Consumer Reports Value Proposition Test: What you can learn from a 29% drop in clickthrough

PPC Marketing: Testing value proposition messaging increases clickthrough 88%

Writing an Email Like a Human “Absolutely Crushed” A Traditional Marketing Send [2 Min Video]

Earn a Graduate Certificate in Communicating Value and Web Conversion

 

Paul Cheney

Writing an Email Like a Human “Absolutely Crushed” A Traditional Marketing Send [2 Min Video]

August 1st, 2016
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“If you write an email like a human being would write an email, you’re going to get a better response.”

So says Nathaniel Ward, Associate Director, Online Membership Programs, The Heritage Foundation. The Heritage Foundation is a non profit conservative think tank focused on conservative policy formation and promotion.

I realize quoting a political organization of any kind is just asking for an incendiary response in today’s political environment, but bear with me on this one.

Partisan or not, they have a very sophisticated email marketing department, especially for a non profit. And Ward’s approach to email testing and messaging is critical for any organization to study and learn from.

Time Stamps:
0:27 – How the test was set up

1:17 – The results of the test

1:26 – Interpretation of the test results

1:43 – Ward’s takeaway for other marketers

You might also like…

Consumer Reports Value Proposition Test: What you can learn from a 29% drop in clickthrough

Online Testing: How a B2B SaaS nonprofit increased clickthrough on landing page by 291%

Email Marketing: Nonprofit achieves 12.5 times higher donation revenue per email than industry average

Earn a Graduate Certificate in Communicating Value and Web Conversion

Daniel Burstein

Email Marketing: Test ideas for five types of email

July 1st, 2016
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Testing your email marketing can help power some pretty impressive results – like a 100% increase in clickthrough or a 114% boost in revenue.

But … let’s be real … it is harder to test your email than to just send a single version of the email idea you come up with.

One challenge with email marketing – to keep your customers clicking and coming back for more, you need to endlessly come up with new messages and ideas for every email you send or set in an automation platform.

However, when you test your email marketing, you don’t get to create just one email for each campaign, you now need an A and a B (and a C and a D … etc. … etc. … depending on how many treatments you have and your list size can support).

To give you some new hypothesis ideas for your next email test, I interviewed Mike Nelson, Co-founder and Head of Marketing, ReallyGoodEmails.com, in the MarketingSherpa Media Center (MarketingSherpa is the sister publishing brand to MarketingExperiments).

He brought examples of five key types of marketing email from his site, which is described as a “modern-day museum” full of emails.

Read more…

Paul Cheney

How Philip Morris & Co. Created One of the Greatest Marketing Campaigns in History Using Aristotle’s Logic

June 23rd, 2016
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“Philip Morris & Co. (now Altria) had originally introduced the Marlboro brand as a woman’s cigarette in 1924,” according to Wikipedia.

In 1954, however, that all changed. Launching what’s known as one of the most universally successful advertising campaigns in history, Leo Burnett created The Marlboro Man.

Whatever you think about smoking, put it aside for a second. Right or wrong, The Marlboro Man produced serious results for Phillip Morris.

The thing that’s interesting for readers of this blog is that Phillip Morris’ team did it by employing a repeatable strategy.

It’s not a strategy that makes it all right to outright lie to your customers, but it is a strategy that you can employ for both great products and bad products.

And it was invented 2,300 years ago by a man named Aristotle.

Aristotle created the notion of the “syllogism,” or “deduction” as it is often translated from Aristotle’s Greek.

Here’s an excerpt from Aristotle’s Prior Analytics that defines “deduction.”

A deduction is speech (logos) in which, certain things having been supposed, something different from those supposed results of necessity because of their being so. (Prior Analytics I.2, 24b18–20)

– Quoted from The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

In last week’s web clinic, “Repeatable Brand Strategy,” Flint McGlaughlin explained it like this:

 

syllogism-definition-branding

 

Aristotle’s syllogisms are at the heart of every successful brand strategy whether the creators are aware or not. Brands can leverage Aristotle’s idea of the syllogism to create a repeatable and successful brand strategy by creating what Flint calls a “virtual syllogism.”

By creating The Marlboro Man, Phillip Morris and Leo Burnett incidentally created the following virtual syllogism:

 

syllogism-branding-example-marlboro

 

It seems simple, but it set Marlboro apart from their competitors who were still trying to highlight things like the “health benefits” of filters or flavors.

 

You might also like:

Repeatable Brand Strategy  [MarketingExperiments web clinic replay]

Inbound Marketing: HP turns interns into brand ambassadors with Twitter contest [From MarketingSherpa]

Brand Affinity: Mellow Mushroom builds engagement via original content, e-club program [From MarketingSherpa]

Hacking Patagonia’s PR Strategy: How to improve your brand’s voice and influence [From MarketingSherpa]

7 Surprisingly Successful Brands on Instagram [From MarketingSherpa]

Does Brand Really Matter? [MarketingExperiments web clinic replay]

An Executive Look at Newspaper Industry Transformation [From MECLABS Institute]

 

Selena Blue

Digital Marketing: 3 test ideas to optimize your incentive offers

June 13th, 2016
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Coupon. Free download. Discount code. Gift card. Complimentary ebook.

These are just a few of the countless types of incentives marketers use to influence customers to say “yes” at the final macro-decision – whether that’s making a purchase, filling out a lead gen form or some other form of conversion.

Incentive can be just what some customers need to commit to an action you want them to take. But how can you ensure your incentive offers are having optimal effect on conversion?

Here are three tests you could use to optimize your incentive offers.

 

dollar-versus-percentage-incentiveIncentive Test #1. Percentage off vs. Dollar amount off

This first test idea is definitely a numbers game.

What do customers see more value in: a percentage discount or a defined dollar amount discount?  One case study from deep within the library of our sister site MarketingSherpa tested this question.

Evo, an online retailer of outdoor gear and fashion apparel, offered a coupon for certain product packages that had an average price of $333, and a minimum price of $250. With these numbers in mind, the team determined that $50 was the ideal discount point.

In addition to a traditional $50 off coupon, the team elected to test a 15% off coupon as well, which roughly equaled $50 off the average price of $333.

The test produced these results:

  • The $50 off coupon produced a 72% higher conversion rate
  • The $50 off coupon generated 170% more revenue than the 15% off coupon

It’s important to measure both conversion and overall revenue with this test. Even if one treatment results in more purchases, it may have lower average order amounts. If the average order amount is lower overall, the treatment with fewer orders of higher amounts could be your best choice moving forward.

  Read more…

Selena Blue

Customer-centric Marketing: How market research and listening to customers informs website optimization

June 8th, 2016
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At the heart of every test or optimization effort should be an informed hypothesis. However, best practices can lead us astray. So where can marketers find inspiration for their next experiment?

The answer often lies with our customers.

This week, our sister company MarketingSherpa has a team of reporters at the Internet Retailer Conference and Exhibition (IRCE) in Chicago, hosting the official Media Center of the ecommerce event.

Courtney Eckerle, Senior Managing Editor, MarketingSherpa, sat down with Matt Clark, Global Head of eCommerce and Digital Marketing, Newark element14, to discuss how marketers can watch and listen to their customers to discover pain points on their sites and in their purchase funnels.

 


Three steps to effective ecommerce sites

To start, Matt outlined three steps marketers should take to ensure their websites effectively serve customers:

  1. Make it easy to find.
  2. Make it compelling to convert.
  3. Make it easy to use.

Matt shared an analogy that highlights the particular importance of that last step:

“It should be like a hotel where when you walk in, you know the light switch is on your right-hand side, the remote is on the table. If it’s not like that, if it’s not that seamless to a customer, you’re going to lose some customers along the way.”

Read more…