Daniel Burstein

Call-to-Action Button Copy: How to reduce clickthrough rate by 26%

March 31st, 2014

“Start Free Trial” | “Get Started Now” | “Try Now”

One of the above phrases reduced clickthrough rate by 26%.

 

DON’T SCROLL DOWN JUST YET

Take a look at those three phrases. Try to guess which phrase underperformed and why. Write it down. Heck, force yourself to tell a colleague so you’ve really got some skin in the game.

Then, read the rest of today’s MarketingExperiments Blog post to see which call-to-action button copy reduced clickthrough, and how you can use split testing to avoid having to blindly guess about your own button copy.

 

How much does call-to-action button copy matter anyway?

The typical call-to-action button is small. You typically have only one to four words to encourage a prospect to click.

There are so few words in a CTA. How much could they really matter?

Besides, they come at the end of a landing page or email or paired with a powerful headline that has already sold the value of taking action to the prospect. People have already decided whether they will click or not, and that button is a mere formality, right?

To answer these questions and more, let’s go to a machine more impressive than the Batmobile … to the splitter!

 

A/B/C/D/E split test

The following experiment was conducted with a MECLABS Research Partner. The Research Partner is a large global media company seeking to sell premium software to businesses.

The button was tested on a banner along the top of a webpage. Take a look at that banner below. 

cta-experiment-start-free-trial

 

Five different text phrases were tested in that button. Since I’ve already teased you on the front-end, without further ado, let me jump right into the findings.

 

Results

cta-test-results

 

Those few words in that teeny little rectangular button can have a huge impact on clickthrough.

As you can see, “Get Started Now” drove significantly more clicks than “Try Now.” Let’s look at the relative changes in clickthrough rate so you can see the relationship between the calls-to-action.

Read more…

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Categories: Analytics & Testing Tags: , , , , , ,

Allison Banko

Digital Marketing: Stop ignoring data and start learning

March 26th, 2014

March Madness has been one heck of a ride so far, huh? This year’s NCAA tournament is pumping out upsets left and right as Cinderella stories rise and brackets burst.

But I’m a Florida Gators fan, and I have to admit, I’m liking what I’m seeing from all of the college basketball madness so far (knock on wood). After a less-than-awesome football season, I’m going to soak up an undefeated record and this No. 1 ranking as long as I can. I’m not above infusing this into my marketing writing, either.

Earlier this week, University of Florida head basketball coach Billy Donovan dished out some words of wisdom off the court.

“For me, I’m always eager to learn, to get better and to improve,” he told reporters.

Gators fan or not, you should take a page from coach Donovan. I have. In fact, I’m putting that quote into play this week as I write this post from the Adobe Summit Digital Marketing Conference in Salt Lake City. I’m immersing myself in sessions, panels, interviews and networking mixers to learn, get better and improve as a young professional. (A special thanks to Adobe for footing the bill for my growth, too.)

 

As a member of the pampered press for the Summit, I was invited to a special session: “Interactive Panel Discussion: Reinventing the Marketing Organization.” Ann Lewnes, SVP and CMO, Adobe, moderated, and was joined by the following panelists:

  • Jeff Dotson, Associate Professor, Department of Business Management, Brigham Young University
  • Jana Rich, Managing Director, Russell Reynolds Associates
  • Pete Stein, CEO, Razorfish
  • Jeff Titus, General Manager of Digital Technology Solutions and Strategy, Audi of America

 

Lewnes opened the discussion with findings from Adobe’s Digital Roadblock: Marketers struggle to reinvent themselves, published this month. The study was conducted by surveying 1,000 marketers and data was collected by ResearchNow.

One of the top takeaways: “Marketers recognize the importance of data, but aren’t widely using it to make informed decisions.” Here are the supporting facts and figures:

  • 76% of marketers agree they need to be more data-focused to succeed
  • 49% of marketers report “trusting my gut” to guide decisions on where to invest their marketing budgets
  • 72% of marketers agree that long-term success is tied to proving marketing return on investment

 adobe-research-data

 

Titus, who was also a keynote speaker at Adobe Summit, highlighted the data above when asked to give the audience some practical advice.

“Every marketer should understand when you put something out there, you should have the ability to measure it,” he said.

You must orient your team to that, Titus added, and don’t just look at your customer’s journey after the fact – seek those real-time results.

“Measure something – empirical data – that is really the most important piece of advice I can offer,” he said.

Titus offered how data can even drive risk taking in marketing, suggesting short cycles for testing. These are quick little investments that allow your team to see what’s working and what’s not in an efficient period of time.

“In engineering, we say ‘fail fast,’ Titus joked.

Or perhaps, learn fast. Learn what changes you can use to refine your campaigns and efforts. Data is a key piece to figuring this out.

Dotson offered an academic perspective on the matter from his observations in the classroom.

Historically, he said, “marketing was the fuzzy major for students.”

Read more…

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John Tackett

Email Marketing: Change in CTA copy increases clickthrough 13%

March 24th, 2014

The “ask.”

When you strip marketing down to its core, your call-to-action is arguably the most important element in your email marketing.

If you get it just right with your copy, customers will give their permission with clicks, downloads, a purchase or whatever desired action is intended.

Get the copy wrong, however, and a CTA is becomes “ignore-the-action” from the customer’s perspective.

So what role does copy play in the success of a CTA?

A pretty big one.

To illustrate this, let’s look at a recent Web clinic where the MECLABS research team revealed the results of an experiment that drilled down into how CTA copy impacts customer action.

Here’s a little research information on the test.

Background: An audio technology and engineering company offering professional and personal audio products.

Goal: To significantly increase the number of clicks from a promotional email.

Primary Research Question: Which email CTA copy will produce the greatest clickthrough rate?

Approach: A/B single factorial split test

 

Control

cta-test-control

 

In Version A, the team hypothesized that using “Shop Now” as the CTA copy was a potential source of customer anxiety.

According to the MECLABS Conversion Heuristic, anxiety is simply a negative factor that reduces the likelihood a potential customer will take a desired action.

 

Treatment

cta-test-treatment

 

In Version B, the team tested “View Details” as the CTA copy.

 

Results

 cta-test-results

  Read more…

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John Tackett

Web Optimization: Simple CTA change increases conversion 77%

March 20th, 2014

Small changes can make a big difference in the user experience.

In today’s MarketingExperiments Blog post, I want to dive right into one of those small changes shared by James Coulter, Marketing Optimization Specialist, Sophos, during his presentation at Optimization Summit 2013.

After receiving some brutal user feedback, James realized that optimizing the user experience was vital to the organization’s success.

James’ strategy to improve the experience was simple: Start with small changes and test your way into a big impact.

Let’s take a look at some of the research notes and get a little background information on the test.

Background: Sophos, a provider of IT security solutions for businesses.

Objective: To increase leads from quote requests.

Primary Research Question: Which CTA copy will result in the most leads?

Approach: A/B split test

 

Control

sophos-cta-control

In the control, James’ team identified the “Request a quote” call-to-action copy as a point of potential friction in their lead generation process.

 

Treatment  

sophos-cta-treatment

The team hypothesized that changing the copy in the call-to-action to “Request pricing” would increase conversion based on user feedback.

Read more…

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Anuj Shrestha

Analytics: How metrics can help your inner marketing detective

March 17th, 2014

Why are there so many different metrics for the same component of a website? For example, page views, visits, unique visitors and instances, just to name a few. Which metrics should you use? Are all of these metrics really helpful?

Well, they exist because these metrics are tracked differently and yield different interpretations.

However, much more knowledge can be gained by analyzing these metrics with respect to one another combined with usage of segments, or characteristics of users.

For example, if we look at the metrics for page views on your site with respect to number of visits between two browsers, such as Chrome versus Firefox, and then discover that Chrome users actually have more page views per visit on average than Firefox users.

That could indicate that the customers using Firefox may be of a different demographic with a different level of motivation compared to Chrome users. Or, it could also mean that the site functionality or user experience on Chrome could be different than Firefox. For example, I know on my own computer, Chrome displays website content in a smaller font than Firefox.

In today’s blog post, learn how just these two metrics combined together can put you in a detective mindset.

 

Don’t just investigate what customers do, investigate where they go

There are plenty of great free and paid analytics tools out there to help you investigate customer behavior, but for the sake of this example, I’m going to talk specifically about Adobe’s analytics tool.

An interesting advanced feature in the platform allows you to set custom tracking on link clicks on a page that when combined with other metrics, could reveal great findings.

For example, let’s say you have a call-to-action that takes a visitor to the cart. By using custom tracking, you can track how many visitors interact with the CTA on the page and compare that to the next page flow.

If you see a significantly higher number of visitors clicking the CTA, but not as many cart page views on the next page report, it could mean that there is some technical issue preventing the visitors from going to the next page.

There could also be a lot of “accidental” or “unintentional” clicks from visitors clicking the back button before the next page even loads, which can be very common on mobile sites.

If there are significantly less visitors clicking the CTA and more cart page views on the next page flow, what would that indicate?

Perhaps people are using the forward button frequently because they came back to the page after they have seen the cart.

  Read more…

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John Tackett

Landing Page Optimization: Radio buttons vs. dropdowns

March 13th, 2014

Radio buttons or dropdowns?

The question is arguably on the borderline of arbitrary, but as we discovered, this choice is far more important that one might think.

During a recent Web clinic, Austin McCraw, Jon Powell and Lauren Pitchford, all of MECLABS, revealed the results of an experiment that put button options to the test.

So, let’s take a closer look at the research notes for some background information on the test.

Background: A large people search company catering to customers searching for military personnel.

Goal: To significantly increase the total number of subscriptions.

Primary Research Question: Which subscription option format will produce the highest subscription rate: radio buttons or a dropdown menu?

Approach: A/B single factorial split test

In Treatment 1, the research team hypothesized that the length of the radio button layout was a source of user friction in the form.

Editor’s Note: For the purposes of the MarketingExperiments testing methodology, friction is defined as “a psychological resistance to a given element in the sales or signup process.”

 

 

In Treatment 2, the team tested a dropdown style option selection to reduce the perceived friction in the display.

 

  Read more…

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