Paul Cheney

Stock Images Tested: Does ethnicity in marketing images impact purchases?

August 4th, 2014

Does ethnicity in marketing images affect a campaign’s performance?

Besides being an important marketing question, it’s also an interesting social question.

The MECLABS research team asked this question because they needed to find the best performing imagery for the first step in the Home Delivery checkout process for a MECLABS Research Partner selling newspaper subscriptions.

The test they designed was simple enough:

Background: Home Delivery ZIP code entry page for a newspaper subscription.

Goal: To increase subscription rate.

Research Question: Which design will generate the highest rate of subscriptions per page visitor?

Test Design: A/B variable cluster split test

 

Control: Standard image of newspaper on welcome mat

ethnicity-test-control

 

Treatment 1: Stock image of African American man reading newspaper

ethnicity-test-treatment1

 

Treatment 2: Stock image of older Caucasian couple reading newspaper

ethnicity-test-treatment2

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Categories: Landing Page Optimization Tags: , , , ,

John Tackett

Why Responsive Design Does Not Care About Your Customers

July 31st, 2014

Responsive design, like any new technology or technique, does not necessarily increase conversion.

This is because when practicing Web optimization, you are not simply optimizing a design; you are optimizing a customer’s thought sequence. In this experiment, we discovered the impact responsive design has on friction experienced by the customer.

Background: A large news media organization trying to determine whether it should invest in responsive mobile design.

Goal: To increase free trial signups.

Research Question: Which design will generate the highest rate of free trial sign-ups across desktop, tablet and mobile platforms: responsive or unresponsive?

Test Design: A/B multifactorial split test

 

The Control: Unresponsive design

unresponsive-design

 

During an initial analysis of the control page, the MECLABS research team hypothesized that by testing a static page versus an overlay for the free trial, they would learn if visitors were more motivated with a static page as there is no clutter in the background that might cause distraction.

From this, the team also theorized that utilizing a responsive design would increase conversion as the continuity of a user-friendly experience would improve the customer experience across multiple devices.

The design for the control included a background image.

 

The Treatment: Responsive design

responsive-design

 

In the treatment, the team removed the background image to reduce distraction and implemented a responsive design to enhance user experience across all devices.

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Categories: Analytics & Testing Tags: , , , ,

Carmen Weeks

Ecommerce: How parent brands can reduce user friction and anxiety

July 28th, 2014

The MECLABS Conversion Heuristic is what we use when optimizing our Research Partners’ websites – and now for me as a research analyst, it’s become second nature to optimize every website I encounter.

I say this because truthfully, it’s one thing to simply memorize and understand a formula. But when you’re able to conceptualize and apply it, you own it.

For instance, I was recently window shopping on one of my favorite sites, HauteLook, a members-only ecommerce website that offers limited-time sales of leading brands in fashion, home décor, skincare, and occasionally, luxurious vacations.

I’ve shopped there countless times before, but this time my HauteLook experience was different, thanks to seeing the site from the perspective of an analyst.

 

Lightboxes are not a warm welcome

hautelook-homepage

 

When you get to the HauteLook homepage, you are immediately greeted by a mandatory registration squeeze before you can arrive to the “members only” section, where the sale events are displayed.

Right away, this form causes new users anxiety and potential frustration.

(Editor’s Note: MarketingExperiments defines friction as a psychological resistance to a given element in the sales or sign-up process. Anxiety is a psychological concern stimulated by a given element in the sales or sign-up process.) 

Here’s one problem with front-end registration: The visitor is not able to see what the website offers that might match their motivation to visit the site.

In short, what is the squeeze costing you in sales?

By not allowing a visitor to see what your website offers prior to asking them to join might cause them to exit prematurely because they don’t want to go through the trouble of signing up.

This leads me to my main point:

hautelook-signup

 

Ultimately, one word got me through the gate of anxiety the first time I was here – Nordstrom.

 

Use parent brands for surrogate credibility

In my example, you’ll see copy that identifies HauteLook as a Nordstrom company, which immediately alleviated my concerns and was the first thing to convince me to move forward with the registration.

Using an established brand as a third-party credibility indicator is a great way to help reduce customer anxiety.

Kudos to HauteLook for using an established and well-known brand to relieve anxiety and help increase the sign-up rate while also aiding visitors in making more informed decisions.

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Categories: Ecommerce Tags: , , , , , ,

John Tackett

Email Marketing: Copy test increases clickthrough 37%

July 24th, 2014

Converting attention into interest is really the sole purpose of copywriting.

How you approach that task in your marketing efforts can make a huge difference in the results.

In this MarketingExperiments Blog post, we’ll look at how some tactical copy changes increased one company’s clickthrough rate by 37% to help you craft effective copy of your own.

But first, here are a few snippets on the test.

 

Background: Company selling audio equipment and accessories.

Goal: To increase clickthrough rate.

Research Question: Which email copy approach will generate the highest clickthrough rate?

Test Design: A/B/C variable cluster split test

 

Controlemail-copy-test-control

 

In the control, the MECLABS research team hypothesized the email utilized a headline that was not immediately clear, thus undermining the value of the offer.

 

Treatments 

email-copy-test-treatments

 

Here is a simple breakdown of the differences in the treatments:

  • Treatment 1′s email tweaked the headline to focus on the aesthetics and performance value of the product.
  • Treatment 2′s headline was centered on the overall value proposition of the product.

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Categories: Email Marketing Tags: , , , , ,

John Tackett

Value Proposition: 4 key questions to help you slice through hype

July 21st, 2014

I was originally going to write this blog post to help marketers spot hype in their green marketing claims.

But then, I had an epiphany.

Why focus exclusively on green marketing that may have gone awry at the fringes?

Hype in marketing is far from exclusive to the green crowd and honesty is needed in every claim your marketing makes.

I decided to think a little bigger – much bigger – by sharing four key questions you should ask about any marketing claim to help you slice through hype and deliver true value to customers.

 

Question #1. Is our claim tangible? 

value-tangible

 

Our senses love being rewarded, so if your claim offers tangible value, the nature of it should connect directly to the customer experience.

For example, let’s look at the copy above from a recent experiment on green marketing.

The “green value” is in the nature of the manufacturing process and is directly connected to the quality of the product.

This leaves one more thing to consider when crafting tangible claims: Does the nature of the claim actually make the end product more appealing?

 

Question #2. Is our claim relevant to customers’ needs?

relevant-claim

 

I like these examples because all of them, while noble in cause, do not directly connect to a relevant problem a customer is having.

For example, I live in Florida and my desire to avoid sunburns gives the SPF of a sunscreen a greater relevance to my needs than just about any other claim.

Consequently, this is where focusing on claims that are relevant can mitigate the risk of associating products with ideas or causes that are abstract.

A biodegradable pen is nice to have. A biodegradable pen with 12% more ink than the next guy is even better.

The power of relevance rests in crafting copy that deals directly with any key concerns already present in the mind of a customer.

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Categories: Marketing Insights Tags: , , , ,

John Tackett

2 Vital Questions Every Marketer Should Ask of Lead Gen Forms

July 17th, 2014

We’ve all seen them.

Web forms that ask for an exhaustive amount of information in exchange for a paltry white paper – or worse, a static thank-you note that lets someone know Sales will soon start their phone and inbox bombing runs.

But is this truly the best we can do to serve prospects effectively through a balanced exchange of value?

I think not. In a world where Web 2.0 is here, mobile is soon to be the new desktop and content is king, lead generation must do a better job of offering value for a prospect’s information.

In this MarketingExperiments Blog post, we’ll look at the two most important questions every marketer should ask about their Web forms to help refine the lead generation process.

 

Question #1. Does our form only collect the information that is really, really needed?

Assessing the importance of the information your form collects is one of the best places to start.

Far too often, older forms are part of legacy marketing practices, or even worse, I would argue, are new forms with inadequate strategy planned around them.

However, no matter where your form falls in terms of strategy, here are two important questions you should ask about your Web forms:

  • What information do you absolutely need to collect in the form?
  • What additional information would be nice to have?

This will help your team identify which fields can be trimmed so that you’re only asking for information that is highly targeted and relevant to your sales process.

Also, don’t forget to build a review process for your forms that give them a health checkup at fixed intervals. It could be six months, a year, maybe even two – so as long as you dedicate time to assess a form’s effectiveness and performance in meeting business goals.

 

Question #2. How can I increase the perceived value of every field in my form? 

web-forms-value

 

I love the illustration above because it really drives this point home. This is truly how most prospects see form fields.

It is how I see them.

It’s probably how you see them, too.

It’s also how you should mercilessly look at your own form fields when assessing the value they are delivering to prospects in exchange for the desired information.

Consequently, if the value of what you’re offering is not perceived as being worth more than the information you want from prospects, then why should they give it to you?

Read more…

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Categories: Lead Generation Tags: , , , , ,