Posts Tagged ‘conversion rate optimization’

Mobile Marketing: What a 34% increase in conversion rate can teach you about optimizing for video

March 26th, 2015 2 comments

Video is emerging as the new darling of content marketing, and it makes sense.

As a medium, video delivers information customers want about a business quickly and inexpensively thanks to ever-evolving tech.

But how does using video in your marketing strategy stack up when you add the complexity of rendering across multiple devices?

Throw a smartphone or tablet into the mix, and your customer experience can get messy fast.

So in today’s MarketingExperiments Blog post, I wanted to share with you an interesting experiment from our latest Web clinic that increased conversion 34% by putting video to the test in a multidevice experience.

Now before we drive on any further, let’s look at the background on the experiment:


Background: A company offering a variety of dieting programs and memberships with the goal of helping their audience lead a healthier lifestyle.

Goal: To increase landing page membership conversions on mobile and tablet devices.

Primary Research Question: Which use of video will generate the highest conversion rate?

Test Design: A/B variable cluster 


Here are screenshots of the Control and  Treatments on mobile and tablet:



In the Control above, the MECLABS research team hypothesized that the design overall fails to deeply connect the video content with the audience. The team reasoned that a connection to the authority was missing (the personal source behind the content), which would give a visitor the motivation to engage.

The Treatments utilize a few design layouts to help build the missing  authority and rapport with users.    

Read more…

Conversion Factors That Impact Your Online Marketing

January 12th, 2015 2 comments

Why do people say “yes” to your offer?  Any time there is an ask for something, whether you are asking people to purchase something, give you something or to do something, the person can either say “yes” or “no.”

In this short article, I will explain the conversion heuristic and how it can help you optimize your online marketing efforts and get to more yes(s.)


What is a conversion?

Definition — Conversion:  noun. The act or process of changing from one form, state, etc., to another[1]. If you are a marketer, it is your primary responsibility to help convert a prospect’s interest into an action.

There are many different actions a marketer may wish the prospect take, such as entering their information into a contact form, subscribing to an email newsletter or making a purchase.

When your prospect is presented with your request to do something, they can say “yes” or “no.”  If the prospect says “yes” to your request and they take action, a conversion has occurred.

Read more…

Why Responsive Design Does Not Care About Your Customers

July 31st, 2014 6 comments

Responsive design, like any new technology or technique, does not necessarily increase conversion.

This is because when practicing Web optimization, you are not simply optimizing a design; you are optimizing a customer’s thought sequence. In this experiment, we discovered the impact responsive design has on friction experienced by the customer.

Background: A large news media organization trying to determine whether it should invest in responsive mobile design.

Goal: To increase free trial signups.

Research Question: Which design will generate the highest rate of free trial sign-ups across desktop, tablet and mobile platforms: responsive or unresponsive?

Test Design: A/B multifactorial split test


The Control: Unresponsive design



During an initial analysis of the control page, the MECLABS research team hypothesized that by testing a static page versus an overlay for the free trial, they would learn if visitors were more motivated with a static page as there is no clutter in the background that might cause distraction.

From this, the team also theorized that utilizing a responsive design would increase conversion as the continuity of a user-friendly experience would improve the customer experience across multiple devices.

The design for the control included a background image.


The Treatment: Responsive design



In the treatment, the team removed the background image to reduce distraction and implemented a responsive design to enhance user experience across all devices.

Read more…

Landing Page Optimization: Testing green marketing increases conversion 46%

June 5th, 2014 2 comments

Green marketing is a tactic built on the premise that environmental preference will hopefully equal customer preference.

But does green marketing truly have an impact on customer purchase behavior?

In today’s MarketingExperiments Blog post, we’ll take a look at an experiment that was featured in a recent Web clinic that put green marketing to the test.

Before we dive in, let’s review the research notes on the test.

Background: A mid-sized furniture company selling mattresses.

Goal: To increase the overall number of mattress purchases.

Research Question: Which credibility approach will produce the highest rate of mattress purchases?

Test Design: A/B variable cluster split test




During the Web clinic, the MECLABS research team explained the featured product was one of only a few mattresses that are currently GreenGuard Gold certified.

Consequently, they hypothesized the certification had little emphasis on the page design and was not communicating the full value of the certification.




In the treatment, additional copy was added to increase the emphasis on the full value of the GreenGuard certification.





The additional GreenGuard copy increased conversion nearly 46%.

Read more…

Lead Generation: Is your registration form part of the customer journey?

June 2nd, 2014 No comments

“Too long.”

“Get rid of the phone number!”

“Can you remove the fields?”

These are common responses from marketers who attend our Web clinics on lead generation, and they are all excellent suggestions for optimizing lead generation forms.

But what if you’re one of the marketers in an organization where changes to your lead gen form would be an act just shy of declaring war on your sales team?

In this MarketingExperiments Blog post, I want to share the results of a recent experiment presented by Austin McCraw, Ben Huppertz and Ben Filip, all of MECLABS, in which one company generated more leads without significantly reducing the number of fields.


Background: A large news syndication company.

Goal: To increase the overall number of leads on a “Request More Information” form.

Research Question: Which form design will result in the highest number of new member sign-ups?

Test Design: A/B split test





In the Web clinic, Austin explained the control page featured 11 form fields in total with 10 required. The page also had left sidebar navigation followed by three additional calls-to-action at the bottom.


Treatment A



Treatment A added four more form fields for a total of 15 fields (nine required) and eliminated both the navigation and additional CTAs at the bottom of the page. It also added a customer testimonial on the right.


Treatment B


For Treatment B, the form fields were reduced to 10 fields (all required).

Read more…

Analytics: How metrics can help your inner marketing detective

March 17th, 2014 No comments

Why are there so many different metrics for the same component of a website? For example, page views, visits, unique visitors and instances, just to name a few. Which metrics should you use? Are all of these metrics really helpful?

Well, they exist because these metrics are tracked differently and yield different interpretations.

However, much more knowledge can be gained by analyzing these metrics with respect to one another combined with usage of segments, or characteristics of users.

For example, if we look at the metrics for page views on your site with respect to number of visits between two browsers, such as Chrome versus Firefox, and then discover that Chrome users actually have more page views per visit on average than Firefox users.

That could indicate that the customers using Firefox may be of a different demographic with a different level of motivation compared to Chrome users. Or, it could also mean that the site functionality or user experience on Chrome could be different than Firefox. For example, I know on my own computer, Chrome displays website content in a smaller font than Firefox.

In today’s blog post, learn how just these two metrics combined together can put you in a detective mindset.


Don’t just investigate what customers do, investigate where they go

There are plenty of great free and paid analytics tools out there to help you investigate customer behavior, but for the sake of this example, I’m going to talk specifically about Adobe’s analytics tool.

An interesting advanced feature in the platform allows you to set custom tracking on link clicks on a page that when combined with other metrics, could reveal great findings.

For example, let’s say you have a call-to-action that takes a visitor to the cart. By using custom tracking, you can track how many visitors interact with the CTA on the page and compare that to the next page flow.

If you see a significantly higher number of visitors clicking the CTA, but not as many cart page views on the next page report, it could mean that there is some technical issue preventing the visitors from going to the next page.

There could also be a lot of “accidental” or “unintentional” clicks from visitors clicking the back button before the next page even loads, which can be very common on mobile sites.

If there are significantly less visitors clicking the CTA and more cart page views on the next page flow, what would that indicate?

Perhaps people are using the forward button frequently because they came back to the page after they have seen the cart.

  Read more…