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Posts Tagged ‘conversion rate optimization’

Email Marketing: Copy test increases clickthrough 37%

July 24th, 2014 3 comments

Converting attention into interest is really the sole purpose of copywriting.

How you approach that task in your marketing efforts can make a huge difference in the results.

In this MarketingExperiments Blog post, we’ll look at how some tactical copy changes increased one company’s clickthrough rate by 37% to help you craft effective copy of your own.

But first, here are a few snippets on the test.

 

Background: Company selling audio equipment and accessories.

Goal: To increase clickthrough rate.

Research Question: Which email copy approach will generate the highest clickthrough rate?

Test Design: A/B/C variable cluster split test

 

Controlemail-copy-test-control

 

In the control, the MECLABS research team hypothesized the email utilized a headline that was not immediately clear, thus undermining the value of the offer.

 

Treatments 

email-copy-test-treatments

 

Here is a simple breakdown of the differences in the treatments:

  • Treatment 1′s email tweaked the headline to focus on the aesthetics and performance value of the product.
  • Treatment 2′s headline was centered on the overall value proposition of the product.

Read more…

Landing Page Optimization: Testing green marketing increases conversion 46%

June 5th, 2014 2 comments

Green marketing is a tactic built on the premise that environmental preference will hopefully equal customer preference.

But does green marketing truly have an impact on customer purchase behavior?

In today’s MarketingExperiments Blog post, we’ll take a look at an experiment that was featured in a recent Web clinic that put green marketing to the test.

Before we dive in, let’s review the research notes on the test.

Background: A mid-sized furniture company selling mattresses.

Goal: To increase the overall number of mattress purchases.

Research Question: Which credibility approach will produce the highest rate of mattress purchases?

Test Design: A/B variable cluster split test

 

Control

green-marketing-control 

During the Web clinic, the MECLABS research team explained the featured product was one of only a few mattresses that are currently GreenGuard Gold certified.

Consequently, they hypothesized the certification had little emphasis on the page design and was not communicating the full value of the certification.

 

Treatment

green-marketing-treatment

In the treatment, additional copy was added to increase the emphasis on the full value of the GreenGuard certification.

 

Results

 green-marketing-results

 

The additional GreenGuard copy increased conversion nearly 46%.

Read more…

Lead Generation: Is your registration form part of the customer journey?

June 2nd, 2014 No comments

“Too long.”

“Get rid of the phone number!”

“Can you remove the fields?”

These are common responses from marketers who attend our Web clinics on lead generation, and they are all excellent suggestions for optimizing lead generation forms.

But what if you’re one of the marketers in an organization where changes to your lead gen form would be an act just shy of declaring war on your sales team?

In this MarketingExperiments Blog post, I want to share the results of a recent experiment presented by Austin McCraw, Ben Huppertz and Ben Filip, all of MECLABS, in which one company generated more leads without significantly reducing the number of fields.

 

Background: A large news syndication company.

Goal: To increase the overall number of leads on a “Request More Information” form.

Research Question: Which form design will result in the highest number of new member sign-ups?

Test Design: A/B split test

 

Control

form-test-control

 

In the Web clinic, Austin explained the control page featured 11 form fields in total with 10 required. The page also had left sidebar navigation followed by three additional calls-to-action at the bottom.

 

Treatment A

form-test-treatment

 

Treatment A added four more form fields for a total of 15 fields (nine required) and eliminated both the navigation and additional CTAs at the bottom of the page. It also added a customer testimonial on the right.

 

Treatment B

form-test-treatment2

For Treatment B, the form fields were reduced to 10 fields (all required).

Read more…

Email Marketing: Change in CTA copy increases clickthrough 13%

March 24th, 2014 3 comments

The “ask.”

When you strip marketing down to its core, your call-to-action is arguably the most important element in your email marketing.

If you get it just right with your copy, customers will give their permission with clicks, downloads, a purchase or whatever desired action is intended.

Get the copy wrong, however, and a CTA is becomes “ignore-the-action” from the customer’s perspective.

So what role does copy play in the success of a CTA?

A pretty big one.

To illustrate this, let’s look at a recent Web clinic where the MECLABS research team revealed the results of an experiment that drilled down into how CTA copy impacts customer action.

Here’s a little research information on the test.

Background: An audio technology and engineering company offering professional and personal audio products.

Goal: To significantly increase the number of clicks from a promotional email.

Primary Research Question: Which email CTA copy will produce the greatest clickthrough rate?

Approach: A/B single factorial split test

 

Control

cta-test-control

 

In Version A, the team hypothesized that using “Shop Now” as the CTA copy was a potential source of customer anxiety.

According to the MECLABS Conversion Heuristic, anxiety is simply a negative factor that reduces the likelihood a potential customer will take a desired action.

 

Treatment

cta-test-treatment

 

In Version B, the team tested “View Details” as the CTA copy.

 

Results

 cta-test-results

  Read more…

Analytics: How metrics can help your inner marketing detective

March 17th, 2014 No comments

Why are there so many different metrics for the same component of a website? For example, page views, visits, unique visitors and instances, just to name a few. Which metrics should you use? Are all of these metrics really helpful?

Well, they exist because these metrics are tracked differently and yield different interpretations.

However, much more knowledge can be gained by analyzing these metrics with respect to one another combined with usage of segments, or characteristics of users.

For example, if we look at the metrics for page views on your site with respect to number of visits between two browsers, such as Chrome versus Firefox, and then discover that Chrome users actually have more page views per visit on average than Firefox users.

That could indicate that the customers using Firefox may be of a different demographic with a different level of motivation compared to Chrome users. Or, it could also mean that the site functionality or user experience on Chrome could be different than Firefox. For example, I know on my own computer, Chrome displays website content in a smaller font than Firefox.

In today’s blog post, learn how just these two metrics combined together can put you in a detective mindset.

 

Don’t just investigate what customers do, investigate where they go

There are plenty of great free and paid analytics tools out there to help you investigate customer behavior, but for the sake of this example, I’m going to talk specifically about Adobe’s analytics tool.

An interesting advanced feature in the platform allows you to set custom tracking on link clicks on a page that when combined with other metrics, could reveal great findings.

For example, let’s say you have a call-to-action that takes a visitor to the cart. By using custom tracking, you can track how many visitors interact with the CTA on the page and compare that to the next page flow.

If you see a significantly higher number of visitors clicking the CTA, but not as many cart page views on the next page report, it could mean that there is some technical issue preventing the visitors from going to the next page.

There could also be a lot of “accidental” or “unintentional” clicks from visitors clicking the back button before the next page even loads, which can be very common on mobile sites.

If there are significantly less visitors clicking the CTA and more cart page views on the next page flow, what would that indicate?

Perhaps people are using the forward button frequently because they came back to the page after they have seen the cart.

  Read more…

Conversion Rate Optimization: Why is split testing so powerful?

February 13th, 2014 4 comments

Imagine if you could split test your life.

Essentially, you would never be faced with a conundrum again. You could choose to both send your daughter to the state school and the Ivy League college.

You could marry your high school sweetheart and that special someone you just met.

You could buy the Prius and the Tesla.

Then, you wait and you measure.

You would finally determine empirically which decision is best.

Of course, you can’t A/B test your life. That’s why there are 7,139 books in Amazon’s decision-making and problem solving category.

 

Don’t guess about your customers – know

But you, as a marketer, can split test. If you don’t know which subject line or headline will work, try them both and let the customer decide.

You can use Web optimization to make the best decisions:

  • Make some assumptions based on what you’ve learned about your customers
  • Use those assumptions to create treatments that test different hypotheses about the customer
  • Split your audience with an equal amount of similar customers being exposed to each treatment
  • Review and validate the results
  • Determine what can be learned about the customer and use that knowledge to repeat the process, becoming a little wiser each time

This process can add “thousands and thousands of dollars” in monthly revenue, as it did for Cars.com.

Web optimization can increase referrals and membership renewals, as it did for AARP.

 

What have you been able to do with Web optimization? Let us shine a light on your efforts.

Perhaps you’ve already discovered the power of split testing.

Of learning instead of guessing. Of experimenting instead of assuming.

You’ve discovered that experimenting and learning easily replace assumptions and guesswork about your customers.

If so, we’d like to hear your story even if the rest of your company has yet to catch up.

Others overlooking the power of this evidence-based technique is what frustrates many successful optimizers.

The good news is there’s a place where marketers can come together and learn what works in website optimization from each other. That place is Web Optimization Summit.

 

This year’s Summit will be in New York City in May. If you have a story, we’d love to hear it. I encourage you to fill out the speaker application and share what you’ve learned with other marketers.

 

You may also like

Customer Theory: What do you blame when prospects do not buy? [More from the blogs]

Customer Theory: How we learned from a previous test to drive a 40% increase in CTR [More from the blogs]

The Web as a Living Laboratory: The Three Most Important Discoveries from Over a Decade of Experimentation [Video]