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Posts Tagged ‘landing page optimization’

Price Testing: Order of prices increases revenue 51% per visitor for Portland Trail Blazers

October 27th, 2014 No comments

Last month, I sat down with Dewayne Hankins, Vice President of Marketing and Digital for the Portland Trail Blazers NBA team, to talk about how they leveraged dynamic ticket pricing in the purchasing process for single-ticket buyers.

We talked a lot about the effort as a whole, which involved launching a brand new site and optimizing various elements to provide fans with an experience that was relevant to them.

Testing, instead of relying on gut feelings and instincts, is the only way to truly know if your efforts are making an impact.

The team at the Portland Trail Blazers took testing to heart, and experimented on even smallest elements on the single-game ticket pages — the order of pricing.

Here are the details on one of those tests:

 

Control 

 

On the ticket pages displaying the upcoming games, pricing was listed in ascending order from left to right, with the highest price next to the “Find Tickets” button.

 

Treatment

Treatment

 

On the treatment ticket page, the team reversed the order of pricing. The lowest prices were now next to the “Find Ticket” button.

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Email Marketing: Graphic design elements lift clickthrough 11.97%

October 23rd, 2014 3 comments

Graphic design.

It is a phrase often thrown around without much thought. What does it actually mean to be a graphic designer, and what does that job title entail?

I graduated from the University of North Florida with a BFA and a concentration in graphic design and digital media. While in school, I worked for the school newspaper (The Spinnaker) where I started as an illustration artist, which led to a layout designer position and, eventually to art director.

Later, I helped transform this newspaper into a glossy magazine. This was a big transition because, generally speaking, photos and graphics need to be of a higher quality for a magazine than they need to be for newsprint. This transition also required an entirely new layout and art direction. The new magazine received Best in Show at the Associated Collegiate Press conference in New Orleans. 

I have also traveled to Brazil where I offered pro bono design work for various non-profits working with children in poverty-stricken areas.

I say all of this not for the ego boost, but to give you some background as to who I am and what my trade is.

Merriam-Webster defines “graphic design” as this:

The art and profession of selecting and arranging visual elements — such as typography, images, symbols and colors — to convey a message to an audience. Sometimes graphic design is called ‘visual communications.’ It is a collaborative discipline: writers produce words, and photographers and illustrators create images that the designer incorporates into a complete visual message.

In a perfect world, the designer would get the best words, the best photos and the best illustrations and arrange them all into the most appealing and effective visual message pertaining to the target audience’s motivation levels.

However, all of those things don’t always fall into place. Even if they do, how can you be sure?

 

The control

Below is an email that was created in the same manner that Merriam-Webster uses to describe “graphic design.” There are words on the page, given to a designer, which speak of the company and its product’s value. There is also a professionally-shot photo that shows a couple enjoying the product featured in the email. All of these elements have been combined into a visually pleasing design: 

 

From a design perspective, this is an appealing email:

  • The main headline is a very legible sans-serif (a proven category of typeface for headlines)
  • There is plenty of contrast between the headline and background
  • The email layout itself is dynamic, leading the viewer’s eye from left to right and then down the page to the rest of the message
  • Overall, best design practices have been used (color, proximity, scale, etc.)

Landing Page Optimization: 5 factors that lead to (and prevent) conversion

August 18th, 2014 1 comment

Anytime we share research about overall conversion rate benchmarks, I give the same caveat – while it’s helpful to understand conversion rates for your peers, the bigger question you must ask yourself is how to improve conversion rates on your own landing pages and in your own funnels.

 

Is there a methodical way to increase conversion?

While marketing has tended to be dominated by the marketer with the “golden gut” or the star direct response copywriter, other disciplines in the enterprise – from manufacturing to IT – have developed methodological processes to improve quality and consistency.

The MECLABS Conversion Sequence Heuristic is an attempt to bring the same discipline, rigor and sustainable success to the marketing department. It is part of a patented repeatable methodology (patent number 8,155,995) developed by Flint McGlaughlin, Managing Director, MECLABS (parent company of MarketingExperiments), based on years of testing and research of real product and service offers presented to real customers.

conversion-sequence-heuristic

 

For long-time MarketingExperiments readers, you might be very familiar with the Conversion Sequence Heuristic and have, hopefully, been using it to improve conversion in your own tests. (If so, let me know. We’d love to share those results to inspire other marketers.)

But since the Conversion Sequence Heuristic helps more new marketers discovering it for the first time every year, it helps to occasionally revisit this fundamental approach to marketing every now and again.

Read on for a cursory look at the factors that affect conversion, and if you’d like a more in-depth understanding of how you can apply this heuristic to your own landing pages and marketing efforts, you can take the Landing Page Optimization Online Course.

 

Probability of conversion

The Conversion Sequence Heuristic is not an equation to solve. Rather, it is a heuristic, or thought tool (i.e., really cool checklist) to use as you work on landing pages and other marketing offers.

You can never guarantee conversion, but by making (sometimes subtle) changes to the right areas, you can increase the probability of conversion. This heuristic helps you identify those key areas.

 

Motivation of user

The numbers in front of the different elements of the heuristic indicate how much they impact the probability of conversion. All of the elements are not equal.

The motivation of the user is the single most important factor affecting conversion.

To see why, let me give you a simple example using myself as the customer. I am a huge Pearl Jam fan. If Pearl Jam came to Jacksonville, Fla., I would find a way to be at the concert, even if their ticket selling process, sales funnel and landing page were not optimized. I am highly motivated.

The motivation of the user is also the only element of the Conversion Sequence Heuristic that you cannot change. It is intrinsic in your potential customers.

You can, however, gain an understanding of your potential customers’ motivations to better tap into those natural motivations and better serve your ideal customers while improving conversion.

Read more…

5 Traits the Best Calls-to-action All Share in Common

August 7th, 2014 6 comments

One of the most common questions we receive at MarketingExperiments about optimization is, “What is it that actually makes a call-to-action effective?”

In truth, there are a lot of factors to consider, so in this post, we’ll take a look at five traits the best CTAs all seem to share in common based on our testing research.

 

Trait #1. Alignment

principle-of-alignment

According to Jon Powell, Senior Executive Content Writer, MECLABS, alignment is when “a call-to-action needs to be aligned to a specific customer need or desire. And what I mean by that is, do they like the color blue or do they like the color red?”

In the example above, the original CTA assumed customers will find value in understanding their problem. However, the treatment call-to-action tested to discover if customers find more value in a proposed solution.

In this case, the treatment increased clicks 7% and conversion 125%.

 

Trait #2. Timing 

 

Great CTAs are delivered in a conversation with customers at just the right time. In the experiment above, you can see where the CTA was located in the control and treatment, which indicates how timing plays into effective CTAs.

The control page presented arriving customers with a CTA almost immediately.

In the treatment, the CTA was moved to a time-delayed pop-under. The problem for these customers was they missed the opportunity to convert interest into action, which explained why the treatment decreased conversion 29%.

 

Trait #3. Absorption 

principle-of-absorption

 

Effective CTAs are easy for the customer to absorb as they are scanning the page. They are highly intuitive for customers to understand and engage with.

Here’s what absorption looks like in a real-world CTA test.

In the control, the MECLABS research team hypothesized the primary CTA for creating an email alert was difficult to clearly see in the design that used the small bell icon to imply notification functionality.

The treatment design was adjusted to ensure customers would see the opportunity to create a free alert, resulting in a 2,793% increase in email alerts created.

Read more…

Why Responsive Design Does Not Care About Your Customers

July 31st, 2014 4 comments

Responsive design, like any new technology or technique, does not necessarily increase conversion.

This is because when practicing Web optimization, you are not simply optimizing a design; you are optimizing a customer’s thought sequence. In this experiment, we discovered the impact responsive design has on friction experienced by the customer.

Background: A large news media organization trying to determine whether it should invest in responsive mobile design.

Goal: To increase free trial signups.

Research Question: Which design will generate the highest rate of free trial sign-ups across desktop, tablet and mobile platforms: responsive or unresponsive?

Test Design: A/B multifactorial split test

 

The Control: Unresponsive design

unresponsive-design

 

During an initial analysis of the control page, the MECLABS research team hypothesized that by testing a static page versus an overlay for the free trial, they would learn if visitors were more motivated with a static page as there is no clutter in the background that might cause distraction.

From this, the team also theorized that utilizing a responsive design would increase conversion as the continuity of a user-friendly experience would improve the customer experience across multiple devices.

The design for the control included a background image.

 

The Treatment: Responsive design

responsive-design

 

In the treatment, the team removed the background image to reduce distraction and implemented a responsive design to enhance user experience across all devices.

Read more…

Ecommerce: 3 landing page elements to help increase product emphasis

July 14th, 2014 No comments

The elements on a product page are often one of the most underutilized tools a marketer has at their disposal. I say this, because let’s be honest, I’d wager few folks think of design elements on a product page in a “tool mindset.”

But in some respects, that’s exactly what they are, and ultimately, that’s how you will determine the kind of customer experience you build in ecommerce.

In this MarketingExperiments Blog post, I wanted to share three elements you can tweak to help emphasize important products and maybe even increase your revenue along the way.

 

Element #1. Size 

product-page-elements

 

Here’s an excellent example of how resizing a product image can help you place emphasis on it.

In the control, there were three products on the right sidebar and they were all equally weighted – that is a problem.

Nothing really stood out, which made drawing a clear conclusion for customers a little difficult.

In the treatment, instead of having three separate products on the page, the marketers hypothesized that a single product with a dropdown selection for a computer operating system would increase conversion.

Their hypothesis was right – the results from the tests included a 24% increase in revenue.

 

Element #2. Color 

email-product-testing

 

Here is another example of using elements in an email that you should pay close attention to because products are not trapped on pages in storefronts.

That perception is far from reality.

According to the MarketingSherpa Ecommerce Benchmark Study (download a complimentary copy at that link), email is one of the biggest drivers of ecommerce traffic.

In the treatment, the number of products were reduced, and bright red copy was used as supporting emphasis. I’m not fluent in Italian, but in any language, that is a good thing.

As you can see, color emphasis and copy now drive this email. From the changes in the treatment, I can intuitively understand the desired outcome:

  • I can order something at a great price
  • I get something free (gratis) as a thank-you gift
  • It only takes three easy steps to order

The treatment delivered a 24% increase in revenue with the right changes needed to have a powerful impact.

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